The copier industry is all about introducing new copiers.  Oftentimes, a copier might even be updated or replaced in a manufacturer’s product line more than once a year, bypassing the hundreds of thousands of used copiers such as used Xerox or Canon copiers freely available on the open market.  Why does the copier industry do this, pushing new models when there are plenty of service able used copiers?  We’ll address why these manufacturers of monochrome and color copiers do this in the remainder of this article below.

  1. Manufacturers Don’t Make Money on Used Copiers

The truth is, manufacturers simply don’t make any money on used copiers. They might make money off of toner or ink cartridges for the used machines, but there is no money for manufacturers in the market exchange of used copiers.  This cuts into the manufacturer’s bottom line, which is why manufacturers are happy to push newer models as an alternative to used copiers.  Whether HP, Lexmark, Xerox, Brother, or even Canon copiers, these manufacturers don’t make money selling used copiers.

  1. New Copiers Are Not Better Than Used Copiers

Beware of the myth put forth by manufacturers that new is always better than used.  Oftentimes used copiers have capabilities that closely match newer versions, so don’t be tricked into buying new when you can purchase perfectly serviceable used copiers.  Technology moves fast, but not as fast as the manufacturers would lead you to believe.  Has paper and toner really changed that much in the last 15 years?  Do you really need a new copier?

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  1. Your Supplies Will Likely Cost More Than Your New Copier

It’s sort of an industry-wide secret that over time the average business or consumer will probably spend more on their copier supplies than they will for their actual copier.  Your laser color copier for example requires you to replace the drum, the magenta, yellow, cyan, and black toners separately.  In addition, you’ve got all kinds of moving parts inside the machine, many made of plastic, which simply aren’t created to last for hundreds of thousands of duty cycles.

Instead of wasting money buying something new that is essentially a wear item, buy something that costs perhaps half as much, and just maintain what’s necessary.  Buying used copiers and maintaining only what is necessary will save you a bundle!

  1. The True Cost of a Copier Requires Factoring In Maintenance

Manufacturers don’t want you to know that copiers are not made to last forever, simply because they make more money selling new copiers, not by selling parts.  There is simply more competition in this space.  While this seems less than ethical, this is a pretty common practice.

One great rule of thumb is to calculate the replacement cost of your toner or ink cartridges, plus the costs of replacing the drum and any other essential supplies over a two to three year period and compare between manufacturers. There’s also maintenance of the internals and wear-items.  You will likely find that some models make more sense to purchase when you factor in the cost of maintenance!

  1. New Copiers Lose Value the Moment they’re Purchased

Copiers, like cars, lose value the moment they’re purchased.  Unless you can return it to the manufacturer or to a store and get your money back, you’re going to be stuck with a copier that has depreciated in value by 25% to 50% the moment you use it for the first time.  This is why purchasing used copiers, or opting for copier leasing options makes sense.

Used copiers are already discounted due to their used status, and copier leasing makes sense because you are essentially paying for maintenance and rental of the unit, without the headache of disposing of it or deciding when it’s time to push out a large sum of cash to buy a new copier.  Copier leasing helps you have one less thing to worry about!

Correct-Tek Copier Service

1514 E. Waverly Ct.

Arlington Heights, IL 60004 US

Tel: 847-398-5212

Mobile: 847-398-5212

Email: ctcopier@sbcglobal.net

Web: http://www.ctcopier.com/

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